Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument

Mount St Helens National Volcanic Monument
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Mount St Helens National Volcanic Monument is a U.S. National Monument that includes the area around Mount St. Helens in Washington. It was established on August 27, 1982 by U.S. President Ronald Reagan following the 1980 eruption. The 110,000 acre (445 km2) National Volcanic Monument was set-aside for research, recreation, and education. Inside the Monument, the environment is left to respond naturally to the disturbance.

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Mount St Helens - National Volcanic Monument

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Mount St Helens National Volcanic Monument is a U.S. National Monument that includes the area around Mount St. Helens in Washington. It was established on August 27, 1982 by U.S. President Ronald Reagan following the 1980 eruption. The 110,000 acre (445 km2) National Volcanic Monument was set-aside for research, recreation, and education. Inside the Monument, the environment is left to respond naturally to the disturbance.

Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument
Mount St Helens – National Volcanic Monument

Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument was the United States’ first such monument managed by the U.S. Forest Service. At dedication ceremonies on May 18, 1983, Max Peterson, head of the USFS, said, “we can take pride in having preserved the unique episode of natural history for future generations.” Since then, many trails, viewpoints, information stations, campgrounds, and picnic areas have been established to accommodate the increasing number of visitors each year.

Mount St Helens, located in southwestern Washington about 50 miles northeast of Portland, Oregon, is one of several lofty volcanic peaks that dominate the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest; the range extends from Mount Garibaldi in British Columbia, Canada, to Lassen Peak in northern California. Geologists call Mount St. Helens a composite volcano (or stratovolcano), a term for steepsided, often symmetrical cones constructed of alternating layers of lava flows, ash, and other volcanic debris. Composite volcanoes tend to erupt explosively and pose considerable danger to nearby life and property. In contrast, the gently sloping shield volcanoes, such as those in Hawaii, typically erupt nonexplosively, producing fluid lavas that can flow great distances from the active vents. Although Hawaiian-type eruptions may destroy property, they rarely cause death or injury. Before 1980, snow-capped, gracefully symmetrical Mount St. Helens was known as the “Fujiyama of America.” Mount St. Helens, other active Cascade volcanoes, and those of Alaska form the North American segment of the circum-Pacific “Ring of Fire,” a notorious zone that produces frequent, often destructive, earthquake and volcanic activity.

Windy Ridge is the closest view guide open toward the overall population. Starting in the mid year of 1983, guests have possessed the capacity to drive to Windy Ridge, on U.S. Timberland Service Road 99, just 4 miles (6.4 km) upper east of the cavity. From this vantage point neglecting Spirit Lake, individuals see firsthand the proof of a spring of gushing lava’s obliteration, as well as the astounding, progressive (yet speedier than initially anticipated) recuperation of the area as revegetation returns and untamed life returns.

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